I'M PREGNANT...CAN I STILL HAVE MY DAILY DOSE OF CAFFEINE?

When you are pregnant there is so much advice that people are willing to give you, some of which needs to be taken with a grain of salt.

Whether it be about parenting methods, birthing interventions, sleeping arrangements or what food and drinks you should or shouldn’t be consuming, everyone has (and is entitled to) their opinion.

When it comes to food and drinks there are some recommendations from well-recognized bodies in terms of foods and beverages that should be avoided for a number of reasons to protect the health of both you and your baby. No doubt you will each know someone that went through their pregnancy who avoided everything from any form of deli meat, soft cheese and seafood to those that just couldn’t quite give up their Sunday morning runny eggs or weren’t bothered about washing every single salad item before it went into their mouth.

When it comes to beverages we all know that alcohol should be avoided during pregnancy as there is no safe limit. However, what about caffeine; how will it affect your morning cuppa when you are carrying a little one and what effect does caffeine have on the development of your baby?  When looking at caffeine and pregnancy there is a little more research within this area. Studies have reported that caffeine intake has been reported to be associated with a reduction in birth weight, however the exact level is still unknown. One study with more the 2500 women in the UK confirmed that a maternal intake of more than 300mg per day was associated with low birth weight or foetal growth restriction (300mg per day is about 3-4 cups of coffee using the instant variety).  It also found that an average caffeine intake of greater than 100mg per day was associated with a reduction in birth weight in the third trimester. Although the threshold for which the risk of foetal growth restriction and lower birth weights increases, it concluded that the risk was reduced in those women consuming less than 100mg per day (approximately one coffee per day). The National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) of Australia pledged to determine a recommended intake of caffeine for pregnant women within Australia following the publication of these findings.

So what’s the recommendation?

Australian guidelines recommend you limit your intake to less than 200 mg per day, so that's about one to two instant coffees a day and two to three cups of tea. Be mindful that your favorite barista coffee will contain more caffeine than your home instants.

It is advised that to be particularly mindful of your caffeine intake during your first trimester due to that time period being the greatest risk for miscarriage. However if you love your daily dose of coffee and have multiple cups per day, reducing your intake when pregnant may be something that you struggle with. You may also be more likely to experience the nasty withdrawal symptoms such as persistent headaches and further feelings of fatigue, which is just what you need when you are already feeling that way through growing a human within you.

It is important to consider other sources on top of your standard coffee also as caffeine isn't just found in your tea and coffee. If you’ve been indulging in some chocolate with your coffee or enjoy a soft drink with lunch these count towards your daily intake also. You need to be aware that the amount of caffeine is not adding up from other sources, for example one serve of the following equates to the listed amount of caffeine:

  • Serve of instant coffee: 80-100mg
  • Serve of filter coffee: 140mg
  • Black tea: 20 - 70mg
  • Green tea: ~20 - 40mg
  • Coke 355ml: 20-35mg
  • Diet Coke 355ml: 20-50mg
  • Pepsi 350ml: 40mg
  • Red Bull 260ml: 77mg
  • 50g bar of plain (dark) chocolate: ~ 50mg
  • 50g bar of milk chocolate: ~ 25mg.

If the thought of giving up your daily dose of caffeine or missing out on that warm cuppa, especially with winter coming, why not try having a cup of warm lemon water (great for your digestive system and immunity) or caffeine free teas whether loose leaf or in bags. There are so many different flavours to select from chamomile, peppermint, apple & ginger. Alternatively if you prefer to stick to your barista brewed coffee you could opt for decaf or a single shot only.

Being pregnant doesn’t mean that you have to give up your morning latte or regular shot of espresso (if you can – great!). Ensure you stick below the Australian guidelines of 200mg/day or speak to your doctor if you are concerned.

Brooke x

THREE PART PREGNANCY SERIES #1: EXERCISE DURING PREGNANCY

Exercise during pregnancy can be a controversial and confusing topic. Often women fall pregnant and then immediately worry if the exercise they have been doing is safe for their baby and what they can now continue doing, some women give up their exercise routine altogether. It can be confusing when trying to look for information on safe and effective workouts for all stages of pregnancy. Even with social media you see those that encourage very low impact and intensity exercise to those continue kickboxing or powerlifting up until delivery date - what is actually right for you?

Being pregnant doesn't mean you have to give up resistance training or any form of activity that you enjoy for that matter. There are many benefits to continue incorporating regular physical activity into your weekly routine given that you have consistently undertaken this form of exercise prior to falling pregnant and have no contraindications. Regular activity during pregnancy is beneficial to both you and your baby, not just physically but for your mind and spirit also. 

EVERYONE'S PREGNANCY JOURNEY IS DIFFERENT:

  • You may find that you have morning sickness (that lasts all day) up until 16-20 weeks, or you may have none at all.
  • You may get pubic symphysis dysfunction or pelvic girdle pain, you might not
  • Your energy levels may be rock bottom, or they may be similar to before you fell pregnant.

The list is endless, but it is important to recognize that everyone is different and what one woman is able to continue doing may be completely different to another.

HOW DO I KNOW WHAT IS AND ISN'T SAFE FOR ME?

Early on in pregnancy you may be experiencing morning sickness, have a desire to keep your pregnancy a secret and be dressing and exercising as though you are not pregnant. In the early trimester you need to be mindful of your baby’s organ development and your body’s core temperature as early miscarriage is more prevalent in these early weeks.

Once you reach about 16 weeks (some practitioners recommend at 12 weeks), it is advised you avoid any exercises that involve you lying flat on your back to avoid supine hypertension. Exercising on an inclined bench however is a great option to still perform a wide range of exercises or attend your favourite weekly Pump class.

As you enter your second trimester you may start to notice your baby bump, altered posture and possible back pain. The hormone relaxin is also increasing within your body which increases joint vulnerability, so whilst you may feel a little more bendy at your yoga class, its important not to over stretch. There is also added pressure and weight on your pelvic floor and altered mechanics of your core so it Is important to avoid performing any kind of abdominal crunch or trunk flexion from here on in.

As you reach 28+ weeks and enter your third trimester this is a major time of growth for your baby. You may experience feelings of fatigue(again), interrupted sleep, fluid retention and weight gain which adds to the additional load on your legs, back and pelvis and can often be when you begin to experience pelvic joint pain.

CONTRAINDICATIONS TO EXERCISE WHILST PREGNANT:

If you have any of the following you should discuss with your doctor or medical practitioner prior to undertaking exercise to understand your condition and ensure you do not do anything that could aggravate or worsen it. Then seek advice from an adequately trained fitness professional in the pre/post natal field such as a suitably qualified personal trainer or women’s health Physio:

  • Pre-eclampsia
  • Restrictive lung disease
  • Incompetent cervix
  • Ruptured membranes (water have broken)
  • Maternal heart disease
  • Preterm labour
  • Persistent bleeding
  • Uncontrolled hypertension

RESISTANCE TRAINING:

If you have been a regular weight trainer prior to falling pregnant it is great to continue lifting weights throughout your pregnancy. Keep the following in mind though and be sure to adjust the intensity, duration and rest throughout your workouts:

  • Decrease the intensity
  • Volume can remain high, given that the load remains low
  • Monitor your heart rate and use the Rate of Perceived Exertion to keep your workouts in a comfortable and safe zone (you will notice that you feel less fit than you used to with all that extra blood volume pumping around your body)
  • Increase your rest periods
  • Body weight, fit ball and resistance tubing workouts are great to keep load on the muscles but decrease the intensity
  • Decrease the load
  • Monitor the duration – don’t try to be a hero and do you normal 60 minute workouts. 20-30 minute circuits are great to target your anearboic energy systems and give your body that ‘after-burn’ effect, whilst not flogging yourself.

CARDIO:

Again, monitor your heart rate and use the Rate of Perceived Exertion to keep your workouts in a comfortable and safe zone. Your heart rate zone will be dependent on your pre-pregnancy fitness levels, but generally keeping it below 150bpm is advised. Otherwise the RPE scale means that you want be exercising at an intensity that you would be able to hold a conversation or sing whilst you are exercising, on a scale of 6-20 you want to be about a 12-14.

  • Avoid high impact or contact activities. You can still do your favorite aerobics class but be sure to take the lower options.
  • Swimming, cycling and walking are great low impact cardio forms. Listen to your body
  • Keep sessions short but regular. Maybe you used to do 60 minutes of cardio regularly, to be mindful of your heart rate and core body temperature anywhere from 20-40 minutes is plenty.

I also recommend adding in regular yoga or pilates to your workout routine whilst pregnant. Yoga is a fantastic form of exercise to help you connect with your breath, baby and body and a great stress relief. It can help you prepare for the fears of labour and birth and nourish your mind, body and soul. Pilates is also a great form of exercise to connect with your pelvic floor muscles, posture and abdominals in a safe and effective manner to keep the core unit and pelvic muscles strong as they become stretched and loaded over the 9 months.

OTHER CONSIDERATIONS:

  • Avoid overheating – keep exercise to the cooler parts of the day, in air conditioned environment and always have water with you
  • Keep well hydrated before, during and after exercise – drink all the water ladies
  • Be mindful of your centre of gravity – as your belly grows your COG beings to shift and you may find you are off balance more easily
  • Listen to your body – if something doesn’t feel right – STOP. If you heart rate is feeling a little high or you a re out of breath – REST. Now is not the time to be running marathons. You may feel great while you are exercising, you may find you are shattered later that afternoon or pull up quite sore the following day.
  • You don’t want to finish your workout feeling completely smashed. Your body is already working overtime to grow and nourish that little human inside of you.
  • Seek professional advice – if you are unsure, speak to a suitably qualified professional, womens health physio or your doctor
  • Everyone is different – just because the lady next to you is still jogging, doesn’t mean that is right for you and your body.
  • Fuel your body with a wide variety of healthy, whole and nourishing foods. Give your bub the best possible head start – everything you eat goes towards your baby. Try your best to eat well.
  • Enjoy the journey! Remember physical activity is to keep your mind and body healthy as you progress through pregnancy. The added benefits of regular exercise are just a bonus.

This topic could be discussed in great detail… and for days! There is no way that I can cover it all in this blog, and I am not attempting to. What I do encourage is for Mumma's to keep moving in a safe and effective manner that is suitable for them. The above are general guidelines and we are each completely different on our pregnancy journey's, there is no right or wrong way to go about it.

Regular physical activity during pregnancy is beneficial to both mum and bub, with some key considerations to be taken into account. Remember to monitor your intensity levels, watch the impact and listen to your body. I encourage you to keep physically active throughout your pregnancy and make time for you. Movement does great things for our mental and physical health, so keep moving, keep positive and always listen to your body.

If you are unsure remember to seek advice from a trusted professional. You should always consult with your doctor prior to undertaking a new or continuing with a current fitness regime to ensure you do not have any of the contraindications listed above. I also recommend seeing a women's health physio to assist in making an assessment of your pelvic floor so that you can do you best to safely keep moving Mumma’s!

If you'd like a safe and effective exercise program whether pre or post natal in the comfort of your home or the gym get in touch with me  x

To make sure you don't miss out on the next blog in this three part series be sure to subscribe below! Part two coming soon: Nutrition during pregnancy.

Photography thanks to Matthew Jewkes

IS IT TIME TO MIX UP YOUR EXERCISE ROUTINE?

It has been shown that cross training is an effective (and fun) way to reach you fitness and weight loss goals

When we continually do the same thing over again our clever bodies adapts to the energy systems used and become more efficient.

This is why you may feel that you stop seeing results in terms of a weight loss goal you may have, that your best time of a 5k time trial is just not improving or that you just can't seem to increase the weight on your bar in the squat track in pump of the gym.

Depending on your goal there may be one form of training that works for you. However incorporating a mix of strength and conditioning, plyometrics, stretching and endurance/steady state based training into an exercise plan can often be more effective than one of these on their own.

So do you regularly hit the pavement, gym or prefer it in the pool? It might be time to change it up to challenge your body and fitness trying something different - even add in a few intervals to your usual lap routine, an incline to your daily jog or some time under tension to your weights.

Keep the body guessing!

Brooke x